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EMU Attends Magna Carta Meeting

EMU Attends Magna Carta Meeting
Published Date: Friday, 27 January 2017

Eastern Mediterranean University (EMU) attended the meeting titled “Magna Charta Observatory of Fundamental Values and Rights” organized by the Glasgow Caledonian University in Scotland. The meeting that took place between the 18th and 20th of January 2017 was attended by EMU Rector Prof. Dr. Necdet Osam and Vice Rector for International Affairs and Promotion Prof. Dr. Cem Tanova.

During the course of the meeting that was attended by university representatives from around the world, institutional values,  Magna Carta’s academic freedom, institutional autonomy and social responsibility values were shared. The necessary procedures for EMU to sign the Magna Carta documents were also initiated. At the Magna Carta Universitatum meeting Prof. Dr. Osam and Prof. Dr. Tanova met with Glasgow Caledonian University Rector Lord Dean of Guild John F. Macleon and Prof. Caroline Parker discussing possible collaborations between the two universities. Prof. Dr. Osam and Prof. Dr. Tanova also discussed collaborations with representatives from other English universities. 

What is Magna Carta?

Magna Carter (Latin for “Great Charter”) or Magna Carta Libertatum (Latin for “Great Charter of the Liberties”), is an English charter signed in 1215. With his charter the authority of the king was limited for the first time granting certain rights and freedoms to the public. It is one of the important historical stepping stones in reaching today’s constitutional order. It was originally signed by Papa III. Innocent, King Johnson and barons in order to make a decision about the authority of the king. It necessitated the king waiving away some of his power and acting according to law. It meant that the power of law was above the wish and requests of the king.

Magna Carta Universitatum is a document that was signed on the 18th of September 1988 at the 900th anniversary of the University of Bologna. It was signed by 388 rectors in Europe and beyond. It contains principles of academic freedom and institutional autonomy as a guideline for good governance and self-understanding of universities in the future. To this day, the document has been signed by 805 universities from 85 different countries.